A new project by photographer Rory Gardiner and studio esinam highlights the subtle beauties hidden beneath the hard surface of London’s oft-maligned brutalist buildings, from the Barbican to the National Theatre.

 

Robin Hood Gardens estate

Photographs : Rory Gardiner

Photographs : Rory Gardiner

‘In contrary to how many people perceive brutalism today, it was once the architecture of utopian visions and ambitions of making people’s lives better through architecture,’ explains Sebastian Gokah of studio esinam.

 

The Barbican Estate

Photographs : Rory Gardiner

Photographs : Rory Gardiner

‘These projects were based on valuing human relationships and interaction and aimed to democratise architecture and the city, making it open for everyone,’ says Sebastian

 

Trellick Tower

Photographs : Rory Gardiner

Photographs : Rory Gardiner

‘Brutalism needs to be explored to be understood and understood to be loved’

 

Robin Hood Gardens estate

Photographs : Rory Gardiner

Photographs : Rory Gardiner

 

Trellick Tower

Photographs : Rory Gardiner

Photographs : Rory Gardiner

 

Hayward Gallery

Photographs : Rory Gardiner

Photographs : Rory Gardiner

 

The Barbican Estate conservatory

Photographs : Rory Gardiner

Photographs : Rory Gardiner

 

National Theatre

Photographs : Rory Gardiner

Photographs : Rory Gardiner

 

The Barbican Estate

Photographs : Rory Gardiner

Photographs : Rory Gardiner

 

Robin Hood Gardens estate

Photographs : Rory Gardiner

Photographs : Rory Gardiner

 

The Barbican Estate

Photographs : Rory Gardiner

Photographs : Rory Gardiner

 

This feature originally appeared in The Guardian.

 

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