CITIES

Throwback Thursday : Seattle In Transit

Definitive motor ways of the past pave way for the future.

Old postcard of the Aurora Bridge.

Old postcard of the Aurora Bridge.

As a city that’s had plenty of recent transportation quirks–Bertha delays and getting stuck, for one–Seattle public transportation has plans to trudge forward in a big way. Last March, Car2Go announced it will up its Seattle fleet by 50 percent, and on Monday Mayor Ed Murray rolled out a new initiative that is slated to drastically change public transportation throughout Seattle by 2025.

Called “Move Seattle,” the plan includes a list of short-term and long-term projects that are intended to make transportation safer and more efficient. Under a combined budget of $835 million, the project would, in the next 10 years, connect the streetcar service through downtown Seattle (the First Hill streetcar line is set to begin service to Pioneer Square this year), and by 2025 connect almost all areas of Seattle and surrounding neighborhoods via light rail, including: University of Washington, Capitol Hill, University District, Roosevelt, Northgate, Lynwood, Shoreline, Bellevue, Redmond, Ballard, and West Seattle.

In honor of Seattle gaining transit-related momentum, we’re taking a look at some of the main roadways and transportation milestones throughout Seattle’s past.

Old Ballard Bridge, 1924: 

Two girls stand on the Old Ballard Bridge, 1924; Photo courtesy Seattle Municipal Archives via Myballard.com.

Two girls stand on the Old Ballard Bridge, 1924; Photo courtesy Seattle Municipal Archives via Myballard.com.

Third and Pike, 1936:

Street cars mark the beginning of public transportation in one of downtown Seattle's busiest intersections, Third and Pike; 1936; Photo courtesy Seattle Municipal Archives.

Street cars mark the beginning of public transportation in one of downtown Seattle’s busiest intersections, Third and Pike; 1936; Photo courtesy Seattle Municipal Archives.

Alaskan Way Viaduct under construction, 1950:

Alaskan Way Viaduct under construction, 1950. Photo courtesty viaducthistory.com.

Alaskan Way Viaduct under construction, 1950. Photo courtesy viaducthistory.com.

Fremont Bridge opening day, July 15, 1917:

Fremont Bridge opening day; July 15, 1917; Photo courtesy Seattle Municipal Archives.

Fremont Bridge opening day; July 15, 1917; Photo courtesy Seattle Municipal Archives.

 

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This feature originally appeared in Seattle Mag.




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